Merthyr Memories: Cyfarthfa Park Swings

by Laura Bray (née Bevan)

Do you remember the Cyfarthfa Park swings?  Not those that are there now, which are but a pale shadow of their former incarnation, but those of the 1970s?

There were two sets of swings in the Park. The Bottom Swings, down by the Lake –  more or less where the miniature railway now runs – contained a wooden, boxed-in roundabout; the most amazing helter-skelter slide which was about half the size, at least to my childhood eyes, of those found in a fairground; and the “baby swings”, for small children.  There was also the paddling pool, usually empty of water, but I recall some hot summers where it was filled and crowded by children in varying states of undress, splashing, both themselves and those on the bank, watching. My main use for the paddling pool, however, was to cycle round the edge, where there was a band of differently coloured paving slabs and where we could see how fast you could go without going over the edge and into the painted blue depths of the dry abyss!

But for me, the main attraction was the Top Swings. These were just off the road between the Chalet where you could buy ice-cream, and the Quar Gate. They contained a six-seater iron rocking horse, which you could push until it banged against its metal supports; a spider’s web roundabout where, depending on how dizzy you wanted to get, you could push from the inside or the outside, then jump on the bars with your legs outstretched and spin till you couldn’t stand up; and a slide, not too high, but which people did seem to routinely fall off. And we ran up the steps to slide down the slide, or raced up the slide itself, turning round at the top to come back down again. In the hot summer of ’76, the metal on that slide burned the backs of your legs, and yet we came back for more.

There were swings there too – a set of cradle swings for small children and a set of normal swings where we raced to see who could swing the highest. Sometimes we would jump off mid-swing to land with a thud on the floor, and there was a kudos in letting go when the swing was high. Then we would run to the parallel bars and the staggered bars, where we could hang upside-down from our knees and see if we could touch the concrete beneath. Not for our generation the soft surfaces enjoyed by children today.

However, the star of the Top Swings was the Swinging Log. These have all but disappeared now but essentially this was a plank, suspended from an A-frame, on which there was space for four children seated. Two more stood, one at either end, and they were responsible for swinging it back and forth. Some of the boys could swing it so hard that the plank reached heights parallel with the top of the frame, 15 or so feet from the ground, moving at speed. How there were no injuries, I never know, either from falling off or from the risk of being knocked out if you stood too close to the swinging end. There were several near misses, but that was part of the fun.

A log swing similar to the one in Cyfarthfa Park

We would take our bikes and bump across the grass between the two sets of swings and then head home – hot and tired, with our hands smelling of rust and our trousers stained by grass. Those were the days indeed.

If anyone has any photographs of either of the playgrounds in Cyfarthfa Park, please let us know.

 

Crawshay’s Tomb

The article transcribed below appeared in the Merthyr Telegraph 138 years ago today.

THE TOMBSTONE OF THE LATE MR. CRAWSHAY

A stone, weighing nine tons, and being 11ft 2in long, 7ft 2in wide, and 1ft 2in thick, has been placed upon the grave of the late Mr R. T. Crawshay, in Vaynor Churchyard. The stone, which is a conglomerate, was selected by Mr R. T. Crawshay from the Rhadyr Quarry, near Llandaff. Around the sides are formed a kind of rockery, but the surface of the stone is quite plain, although beautifully polished. The laying of the stone has been carried out by Messrs Malliphant and Morgan. An inscription will be placed upon the stone.

Robert Thompson Crawshay’s Grave at Vaynor

Donations

This blog has been going for almost a year now, and it looks like quite a success. I have had quite some positive feedback, and I hope it does help to highlight some of the important, not to mention quirky parts of Merthyr’s rich history.

I hope to continue doing this blog for as long as I can……if people want me to.

To help achieve this, if anyone would like to make a donation to help keep the blog going, any contribution, no matter how small would be greatly appreciated, and every penny will go towards the cost of running the blog.

If you would like to contribute something, please see the Paypal application in the side-bar to the right.

Please don’t feel that you have to donate – you certainly don’t, I just want people to enjoy reading this blog as much as I enjoy compiling it, but if you would like to contribute – thank you very much.

Merthyr: Then and Now

Here’s another part of Town that has changed dramatically – Market Square.

The first photograph, from the early 1900’s, shows the old Market Hall at the centre, R.T. Jones department store to the right, and at the left you can just see Bentley’s Hotel (the lamps and the porch).

Photo courtesy of http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/index.htm

In the second photograph from 2012 – the only building that is still there is the former R.T. Jones building. Everything else has been ‘redeveloped’.

If anyone has any ideas or photos they would like to contribute for the ‘Then and Now’ posts, please get in touch.

Merthyr’s Trams

78 years ago today saw the last tram journey run in Merthyr. To mark the occasion, local historian Keith Lewis-Jones has provided the following fascinating article.

Trams at Pontmorlais Circus

The first thoughts of a tram system in the Merthyr area were in 1878, when a scheme was proposed by Messrs. Taylor, Forester and Sutherland, to construct a horse or steam tramway between Merthyr and Dowlais. In 1879, a public meeting was held at the Bush Hotel in Dowlais for the three promoters to explain their plans and to canvass support for the proposed system. The tramway failed to materialise for a variety of reasons, both financial and fear that the toll on the horses hauling trams up gradients, as steep as one in eleven, would make the tramway unprofitable to work.

By 1890, the population of Merthyr was 60,000, and the service of horse cars and brakes was wholly inadequate for the transport needs of such a large population. By this time a large section of the working population was employed at the Dowlais Works, with many living along the Brecon Road corridor and in Cefn Coed

It was therefore proposed to lease out, to a private company, the right to construct Light Railways between Cefn Coed and Dowlais, with a branch running to the centre of Merthyr at Graham Street. As is always the case with such progressive ideas, a great deal of vigorous and influential opposition was forthcoming from vested interests. It was decided to set up a commission to hear evidence and propose a way forward.

In May 1898 the Merthyr Tydfil Electric Traction and Lighting Co. Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of British Electric Traction (BET), made an application for a Light Railway Order under the Light Railways Act of 1896, and the order was granted on 16 May 1899.

The Light Railway Order authorised the construction of three railways.

Railway no. 1 was to be 3 miles 1 furlong 2.8 chains long and was to run from opposite the Morning Sun public house in Cefn High Street via Cefn Bridge, Brecon Road, Pontmorlais Road West, Penydarren Road, High Street Penydarren, New Road & High Street Dowlais to a terminus opposite the Bush Inn.

The section from the Morning Sun to the Merthyr side of Cefn Bridge was not to be constructed until Cefn Bridge had been re-constructed or replaced.

Railway no. 2, 3 furlongs 3.5 chains in length, was to run from the north side of the Owain Glyndwr on Pontmorlais Road West to Graham Street via High Street, terminating at the west end of Graham Street.

Railway no. 3 was 1.7 chains in length and formed the third side of the triangle at Pontmorlais, joining railway no. 1 with railway no. 2 on the east side of the Owain Glyndwr.

Trams at the terminus in Graham Street

The Tram Depot, known as the Traction Yard, was constructed on the site of Penydarren Ironworks and was reached by way of a branch line which left the Dowlais route at the Trevethick (sic.) Street Junction. As well as providing facilities for tram maintenance, the site also housed the generating station for 550 volts direct current. As can be seen in the Company’s name, not only was it set up to operate trams but also to provide lighting within the area.

Traction Yard

For the opening of the system, thirteen single deck and three double deck trams were obtained. The single-deckers, nos. 1-13, were built by the Midland Railway Carriage & Wagon Co. Ltd., of Shrewsbury. They seated twenty-six passengers.

The open top, double deck trams came from the Electric Railway & Tramway Carriage Works Ltd. (ERTCW), of Preston – part of Dick, Kerr & Co. Ltd. They were numbered 14-16 and seated forty-eight passengers.

The first passengers were carried 6 April, 1901 with Dowlais route trams displaying a triangle and Cefn route vehicles a square on the front. The trams ran between 5.15 a.m. and 10.15 p.m. Passengers fares were one penny per mile or part thereof. Some examples being – Merthyr to Dowlais 2d and Cyfarthfa to Merthyr 1d. The fare for a journey from the Morning Sun in Cefn to the Bush Hotel in Dowlais would be 4d.

A tram outside the Bush Hotel in Dowlais

1903 saw the only serious accident to affect the tramway. On 22 January car number 10 left the rails while descending New Road, Dowlais causing no serious injuries, but the tram was badly damaged.

Passenger numbers had declined to 2,086,684 by 1936. The 1930’s had seen a decline in the number of passengers carried, partially due to the high rate of unemployment in the Borough – 41.7% in 1936.

The Corporation had been prevented from competing with the trams under the provisions of the Merthyr Tydfil Corporation Act of 1920 and so the tramway was eventually purchased by the Corporation for £13,500 in 1939, and abandoned on 23 August, leaving the Company to continue electricity generation until 1948.

Merthyr’s Last Tram

During its life, the tramway carried an estimated 85 million passengers and the tramcars covered a distance of around 8 million miles. Apart from the system in Cardiff, Merthyr’s tramway was the longest lasting in South Wales.

A fuller account of Merthyr’s Tram system by Keith Lewis-Jones can be found in Merthyr Historian volume 20.

All photos courtesy of http://www.alangeorge.co.uk/index.htm

Merthyr’s Chapels: Bryn Sion Chapel, Dowlais

Bryn Sion Chapel

In our continuing section on Merthyr’s Chapels, we look at one of the many chapels that once stood in Dowlais but have disappeared in to the ether in the name of re-development – Bryn Sion Welsh Independent Chapel.

Following a disagreement at Bethania Welsh Independent Chapel in South Street, Rev Thomas G Jones and several members of the congregation left the chapel to start their own group, and began worshipping at the old Bethel Chapel at the bottom of Dowlais.

There were, already at Bethel, a group of Baptists who had left Caersalem Chapel, but the two groups worshipped separately (see previous article – http://www.merthyr-history.com/?p=575).

In 1833, Rev Joshua Thomas of Adulam Chapel in Merthyr had been given oversight of the growing congregation, and it became obvious that Bethel Chapel was no longer adequate for either group of worshippers there.

A new chapel called Bryn Sion was built and both congregations moved there in 1834. The Baptist congregation applied to join the Baptist Association, but were refused, so they decided to join the Independent congregation at the new chapel. Some staunch Baptists were unhappy with this and returned to Caersalem, but the majority stayed and the new church began to prosper.

Rev Joshua Thomas continued to have oversight at the chapel until 1836 when Mr Daniel Roberts, a member of Zoar Chapel in Merthyr, but a resident of Dowlais was asked to be Bryn Sion’s first minister.

As the congregation grew it was decided to build a new chapel. The chapel was designed by Rev Benjamin Owen, the minister of Zoar Chapel, Merthyr, and was completed in 1844 at a cost of £1,281.16s.11d. The chapel, as designed was built back from the street and incorporated four houses built in front of the chapel, which was approached by a paved area.

In 1876 a large schoolroom was built at a cost of £320, and a pipe organ was installed in 1894 at a cost of £280. Major renovations were carried out to the chapel during 1901-02. It was at this time the classical porch was built over the paved entrance way. The total cost of these renovations was £953.3s.7½d.

The pipe organ at Bryn Sion Chapel

When Dowlais was redeveloped in the 1960’s, Bryn Sion Chapel was not amongst the many buildings listed to be demolished, and was not included in the Compulsory Purchase Orders. By 1968 however, all the streets around the chapel had been demolished and the congregation had to walk through mud and debris to reach the chapel, and also the chapel was being badly vandalised, so the congregation reluctantly decided that they couldn’t carry on worshipping at the chapel, and they sold it to Merthyr Tydfil Borough Council.

The chapel was demolished in 1969.

Bryn Sion Chapel during the demolition of the houses around it.

The Troedyrhiw Gleemen – part 2

Following on from our last post, here is a report of the Choir’s trip to Portsmouth from the Merthyr Express on 21 August 1920, transcribed by Carl Llewellyn.

Welcome Home to Great Choir

Great Reception to Mr Herbert Llewellyn at Troedyrhiw

The intense interest which has been evidenced by the appearance of Mr H. Llewellyn and party before their Majesties the King and Queen on board the Royal Yacht at Portsmouth, culminated with the inhabitants of Troedyrhiw and district giving to them a rousing reception, at their home-coming on Friday evening last. The services of the Municipal Band,  the Troedyrhiw Salvation Army Band and the Troedyrhiw Mission Band were engaged, though owing to some misunderstanding the latter band was unable to attend to be present in full strength, as its members had not all returned home from their holiday tour. However, the other instrumentalists were there in strong numbers and rendered several selections among which were “The Prairy Flower”, “Pomposo” and “Lynwood”. The party awaited the arrival of Mr. Llewellyn by the 6:40 p.m. T.V.R. train, while the bands and a large concourse of people stayed on the roadway below. Preparations had been made for a procession through the streets; the route taken along Bridge Street and down Glantaff Road, returning from thither and going through Wyndham Street and up the Cardiff Road, thence to the playground of the Boys School, where a stage was erected in order to carry out the evening programme.

The notables present were Mayor of Merthyr (Coun. F. Pedler), Coun. Mrs M.A Edmunds, J.P., Mr and Mrs Gerald Williams  (Agent for the Cyfarthfa Collieries), Mr D. Frances, M.E., (chairman of the party), Mr W. Hale, M.E., Mr W. P. Burrows (manager of the Co-operative Society), Mr Evan Edwards, Mr E. Emrys Jones, and Mr B. Williams (secretary and treasurer of the party). The Mayor, who occupied the chair at the entertainment, said he was very pleased to be present in such a gathering and the purpose it was called for, and he was proud of the honour the conductor and choir had brought to the borough especially to that part of the town. He heartily congratulated them on their good fortune, and then asked the Municipal Band to start the concert with a selection.

The next speaker Mr. D. Frances M.E., who was evidently jubilant at the achievement of the party and who stated that he never felt prouder of anything than to find the boys who worked under him making a stir in the singing circles of the Principality. It made him glad to be an inhabitant of Troedyrhiw, for the village was giving the borough a lead in high honours inasmuch as it continued in Councillor Mrs Edmunds a past chairman of the Merthyr Board of Guardians, she was one of its representatives on the Town Council, and had recently been made the first lady J.P., in the borough. These honours were all deserved, but some were living in hope of seeing in her the first local lady M.P. Yet again his friend, Mr Llewellyn and the young singers bringing with them an undreamt of renown to the place. It was a big and joyful surprise to him when he learnt that his pit-boys had the great privilege of performing before Royalty. The English version of Troedyrhiw was foot of the hill, but it should be on top of the hill, when taking accomplishment into account.

Mr Frances, not unnaturally dropped into the vernacular, and someone in the crowd objected, then the speaker warmly asserted that he was not ashamed of Welsh, of being a Welshman or of speaking the language  as it was his mother tongue. Turning to Mr. Llewellyn he reminded him of Ceirog’s words: “Ti wyddost beth ddywed fy nghalon ” (thou knowest what my heart says) and went into a description of how the party came into being, its work  on behalf of charity and at the same time saying that he had the temerity to pledge the party (in return for the civic reception given to them) to promote a concert in the near future in aid of the Merthyr General Hospital. Finally, he urged all young men and women to strive for improvement socially and intellectually, and to always give their support to good causes.

Councillor Mrs Edmunds J.P., who was prevailed upon to speak, said she would see that Mr Frances kept his promise and that she was exceedingly pleased with what the conductor and choir had done, and congratulated them on the honour received. Nothing gave her greater pleasure than to see young people again as they had done, and as some of their fellows in the village, had achieved lately in educational pursuits. They have plenty of leisure now, and it ought to be used wisely, having a care to avoid all those pleasures which contained an element of evil in them. Mr Gerald Williams who spoke in praise of the work of the choir, said it was a pleasure to him to take part in the reception, knowing how well it was deserved. Their past acts of good-will should be sufficient criterion of something better in the future. Mr W. Hale expressed himself highly pleased, and said he came into contact with Mr Llewellyn prior to the conductor taking up residence at Troedyrhiw. He remembered him when he had charge of the Mountain Ash (Temperance) Male Voice Party which was so successful at Liverpool National Eisteddfod, and bringing home the challenge cup from Crystal Palace. Mr Llewellyn had many choirs under his baton, and was also in great demand as adjudicator and as conductor of Gymanfaoedd.

Rising to respond to the generous felicitations on behalf of the party and himself, Mr. Llewelyn gave a humorous account of their visit to the fleet and the Royal Yacht. He told how they were met by the chief constable of Portsmouth, Mr. Thomas Davies and his wife, both of whom were Welsh speaking patrons, on the South Parade Pier at their first concert, and so enthusiastic were they with the singing that the party was escorted by Mr. Davies round the town, who insisted on paying their expenses. He obtained for them permission from the naval superintendent of the dockyard to see a battleship, and went with them on their visit to H.M.S. Barham, where they gave a concert to the officers and crew, who were delighted with the songs, and invited them to a fine repast in the officers mess-room, where they were presented with a flag, which had been used in the Battle of Jutland as a memento to the party of the visit they had made.

Other gifts were also showered upon the singers.  It was Mr. Davies who brought the command from their Majesties to sing on the Royal Yacht. In describing the performance, the conductor put the choir through the programme exactly as it was given at Portsmouth, so the people at home got as much as was given to the King and Queen.

The several pieces sung were the “Jolly Rodger”, “Cod yr Hwyl”, “Myfanwy”, “Dear Home”, “Evening Bells”,(Mr Llewelyn)’s, own composition, and the two hymns “Hyfrydol” and Aberystwyth”. He related how the singing impressed the hearers, how the Queen approached him and spoke the praise so often retold, of her going to each of the boys and congratulating and thanking them personally, of the King’s enquiries as to their employment, where they came from, and so on. After this they were sent below for refreshments.  Mr Llewelyn pointed out that the party was not one of his seeking, but the young men came to him about two years ago asking to be coached and paying fees to him for so doing. Circumstances had arisen that called for help in raising funds for charitable purposes including the Prisoners of War Fund, and this was whole heartily given. The last success they had attained was well-earned for it was due to their unflagging energies and attention to instructions.

Mr Francis in moving a vote of thanks for the musical treat during the evening said that the sympathies of all were tendered to Mr. Freddie James, who through ill health was unable to go with the party on their trip, and thus was unfortunate in not sharing the honour as it was one which was rarely accorded. He called for a public rendering of “Aberystwyth”, which was complied with. Mr. Burrows suitably seconded the motion and the Salvation Army gave a selection. With the singing of “Hen Wlad Fy Nhadau”  and “God Save the King”, a red letter evening in the annals of Troedyrhiw terminated.