Boxing Day in Merthyr

The report from the South Wales Daily News transcribed below describes some of the events taking place in Merthyr 124 years ago today.

On Boxing Day the weather was dull, and the streets dirty. There were however, many visitors to the town.

The repetition at the Drill Hall by the Merthyr Choral Society of the oratorio Elijah, under the able conduct of Mr Dan Davies, attracted much attention. At the Temperance Hall Mr Hermann Vezin and Company’s dramatic performances were continued. Mr Vezin has been engaged for the whole or the week.

An entertainment at the workhouse was given as usual under the direction of Mr J. W. Morgan, Hirwain. Mr Harris, an Aberdare guardian, occupied the chair, and the body of the hall was crowded with the inmates. Some visitors also were present. The performances of the Merthyr Christy Minstrels, including whistling by Davies formed a special feature in the varied programme. Able assistance was rendered by Miss Rosie Beynon (who sang “In Old Madrid”), Mr W. Meredith, solicitor (comique), Mr Morris, and several others, Miss Wilkins playing the pianoforte accompaniments. Mr Thos. Morris, C.C., Cefn, and Mr Dan. Thomas as, guardians, were present.

Among the incidents of the day it may be mentioned, a child was found in the streets and taken to the workhouse, and in the roadway, opposite the Nelson Inn, a boy was run over and severely injured.

South Wales Daily News – 27 Decemeber 1893

Merthyr’s Girl-Collier

One hundred and sixteen years ago today, the following story broke in the Evening Express, and went on to grip the town for several weeks.

Six days previously, on Monday 30 September 1901, a fifteen-year-old girl had been found working as a boy in one of the Plymouth Ironworks’ collieries.

When interviewed, the girl, Edith Gertrude Phillips, said that she lived with her father, a pitman, her mother and five siblings at the Glynderis Engine House in Abercanaid, but was beaten and forced to do all the housework by her mother when her father was at work. On the previous Friday, her mother had ‘knocked her about the head, shoulders and back with her fists’ for not finishing the washing, so Edith decided to leave home. She dressed in some clothes belonging to her older brother, cut her hair, threw her own clothes into the Glamorganshire Canal, and walked to Dowlais Ironworks to look for a job.

Unable to secure employment in Dowlais, Edith then went to the South Pit of the Plymouth Colliery, and got a job with a collier named Matthew Thomas as his ‘boy’. She found lodgings at a house in Nightingale Street in Abercanaid, and it was there on Monday 30 September that she was discovered by P.C. Dove. The alarm had been raised about Edith’s disappearance by her father on the Friday evening, and following searches throughout the weekend, someone recognised the disguised Edith at her lodgings in Nightingale Street. Edith refused to go back to her parents, and in the ensuing arguments, collapsed from nervous exhaustion and was taken to Merthyr Infirmary.

The National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children immediately started investigating the case, and Edith’s parents were questioned thoroughly. In the meantime, as news of the case leaked out, there was an outpouring of support for Edith, and dozens of people came forward with offers of support for her, some from as far afield as Surrey and Sussex. A committee was formed to start a fund to help Edith, and the met at the Richards Arms in Abercanaid, just a week after the news broke, and a public appeal was made for money to help her.

Evening Express – 17 October 1901

Despite the ongoing investigation by the N.S.P.C.C. and the countless offers from people to provide a good home to Edith, the Merthyr Board of Guardians, in their infinite wisdom, decided that the girl should be sent home to her parents upon her release from the Infirmary. Edith was indeed released and sent home to her parents on 31 October, but within hours, she was removed from the house by the N.S.P.C.C. and taken to the Salvation Army Home in Cardiff.

No more is mentioned in the newspapers about Edith until 8 February 1904, when the Evening Express reported that she had been living in Cardiff, but as the money raised to help her had run out, she had to leave her home. As she was in very poor health, she was unable to find work, so she had appealed to the Merthyr Board of Guardians to allow her to come back to Merthyr, and to enter the Workhouse. A doctor told the Board that Edith didn’t have long to live, so they agreed to allow her to return.

This is the last report about Edith in any of the newspapers, but thanks to the sterling work of Mike Donovan of the Merthyr Branch of the Glamorgan Family History Society, I have been able to discover that Edith didn’t actually die at the workhouse, she recovered and went on to work, in service, at a house in Penydarren, and  died in 1963 at the age of 77.

Evening Express – 4 November 1901